Round-Up

Event round-up: Author MG Leonard at the Guildford Book Festival

Event round-up: Author MG Leonard at the Guildford Book Festival

mgleonardDid you know we would die without beetles? I didn’t either until I heard MG Leonard talking as part of the Guildford Book Festival. Dung beetles clear away the nasty stuff – the clue is in the name – which would otherwise litter our world and cause lots of diseases. Without dung beetles, we would be dead in weeks.

Way to captivate an audience – especially a young one. 

It was clear that MG Leonard had thought about how to keep her audience interested – and she spoke about how children as a general rule are more open to new facts and new ways of thinking than adults. Her event reminded me what it was like to be young, and to be in a state of near-constant exploration. 

I read Beetle Boy for the first time ahead of the event. I have meant to read it since its debut in 2016, but one way or another never got my hands on a copy. The story follows Darkus, whose father disappears in suspicious circumstances. As he investigates, he learns about genetically-modified beetles and a villain called Lucretia Cuter, who is as interested in high-fashion as she is in science. 

I read the book in one setting and chose the sequels for my birthday. I loved how, although it was the familiar and archetypal story of child-vs-big-bad-power, there was so much I hadn’t seen before. For one thing, the villain is not only a woman, she is also a mother, and her child aids our heroes. I can’t think of a single book where a woman with a family is the villain. Female villains are often shown to have chosen something wrong in over family. (Think of Nicole Kidman in Paddington, who totters around London in impossible heals and tight cat-suits.) Lucretia Cutter has both. 

During the talk, MG Leonard spoke about the inspiration for her story, and the pressure to be original. She struggled with many genres because she felt everything had been explored before. The thought which set her on the road to her story was that, although beetles have featured in stories, they are usually shown as monsters. As villains. 

It was lovely to hear a children’s author talk honestly about her writing history. Too often, it can seem that writers were just able to write a manuscript without any learning. MG Leonard spoke about being a child, and about how her ideas seemed to come faster than her writing. 

It is always a pleasure to hear authors talk about their work. There is no better way to gain an insight into the writing process and to add depth to our reading of a novel. Many thanks to MG Leonard for her time, and to the organisers of the Guildford Book Festival.  

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6 thoughts on “Event round-up: Author MG Leonard at the Guildford Book Festival

  1. Lucretia reminded me of Cruella de Ville in 101 Dalmations, and Mrs Coulter in The Golden Compass. I am on the look out for women in STEM who are mentors in the story, and not just the villains like Lucretia and Mrs Coulter. Do you know of any?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What a great question. Offhand I can only think of Dr Mary Malone in His Dark Materials and perhaps Harriet Culpepper in ‘Brightstorm’ (Harriet is an explorer with her own ship.) Phillip Reeve’s books have a balance of mentors and villains – science is used for good and bad equally. An increasing number of young female protagonists aspire to STEM futures but we need some strong mentors.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I love the Beetle trilogy, and I’m SO happy you’re finally reading them! Glad you had a good time at the event; it sounds wonderful 💜. Also, Lucretia’s relationship with her daughter is explored even more as it goes on, and some of it’s heartbreaking! I love Novak.
    Amy x

    Liked by 1 person

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