Young Middle Grade

Younger fiction and Young Middle Grade round-up: April 2019

Princess Of Pets: The Naughty Kitten by Paula Harrison. Illustrated by Olivia Chin Mueller 

img_8925Princess Bea rescues and cares for any animal in need. She finds a lost kitten in a tree, names him Tiger, and tries to trace his owner, but how can Tiger stay in the palace when he is constantly getting into trouble? Is there any way Bea can prove that Tiger has a good side?

An adventurous kitten causes mayhem as he takes risks he is not yet ready to manage. Princess Bea is the perfect story for children with an interest in pets. It shows that having animals in the house (or the palace) is about responsible ownership. Tiger may appear to be causing trouble, but actually, he’s going through a stage which is not uncommon to young cats. Any prospective owner must question themselves about how they will manage this and not blame their new animal friend. After all, if you’re really ready to share your life with a cat, kittens have to be more important than curtains.

A charming story for newly confident readers.

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The Puppy Who Couldn’t Sleep by Holly Webb. Illustrated by Sophy Williams. 

When Lara and her dad find a homeless puppy, they take him in and try to help. Jet seems happy in his new home except for one thing. He never manages to settle at night. With Lara and Dad losing out on sleep, they search for ways to help Jet at night. What is it that upsets him when the lights go out?

This story was inspired by a true tale about a dog in a shelter. Only one thing would help him to sleep at night, so he needed a home which would fulfill that need. Stories like this remind us that animal care is about so much more than having a ‘pet’ to play with. When we take another animal into our homes, we agree to recognise the needs of a fellow living creature. One dog’s needs can be very different from another’s, even within the same species. It is lovely to see a story which reminds us of this.

A gentle story in a real-world setting which is perfect for young animal enthusiasts.

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The Climbers by Ali Standish. Illustrated by Ali Standish. 

All her life, Alma has been told that the trees and mountains beyond her home are dangerous, but no matter how often she is warned of the dangers, Alma wants to explore. One night, she runs into the forest and finds a bear cub with a pattern like a fallen star on his chest.

Alma and Star Bear bond and together they explore the world. Then Star Bear grows big and is sighted by the other townspeople. Afraid and angry, the people cut down the forest trees and threaten to kill Star Bear.

Alma and Star Bear run. That’s when they meet Tully and his tiger-friend Comet. 

An extraordinary story about the price of human progress and how much better we would be as a race if only we could discover some empathy. 

With children marching around the world to defend our climate, with children standing up and telling politicians that time is running out, this book could not be better timed. The talks and marches which have happened have inspired a number of adults, but unless we all stand up and make big changes to our approach time will run out. It already has for too many beautiful animal species. 

Books like this will keep the wonderful generation, the kids who have already raised their voices, actively thinking about the major issues which face our planet today. They will also inspire readers to consider the underlying issues to all the major problems we face – namely a lack of empathy and a culture which puts progress above goodness. 

This is a gentle and moving story which doesn’t shy away from difficult topics but approaches them in a way which won’t frighten young readers. The illustrations contrast the magic of nature with the dull misery of the world’s biggest towns. Sometimes pictures speak a thousand words. 

Another hit from the new Colour range from Little Tiger UK. These books aim to bridge the gap between picture books and early chapter books. 

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Revenge Of The Living Ted by Barry Hutchison. Illustrated by Lee Cosgrove. 

Lisa Marie and Vernon have just recovered from the night of the living teddy bears when they are kidnapped and taken to the lair of the super-creepy villain Ursine. He’s made sure nobody else remembers the battle which took place, and he’s creating an army of teddy bears to fight his cause. Then Grizz, the evilest bear of all returns, and orders the army to fight for world domination. 

The funniest fantasy series in years just got even better. 

Anyone who has walked past that shop we’ll affectionately call Create A Ted knows it is creepy. Anyone who has been stuck inside knows it goes beyond that. Animal skins and stuffing machines and staff who grin maniacally while they jab a pretend needle into a teddy bear. It is painful. And hilarious. Barry Hutchinson has played on the creepiness behind the cuteness to huge effect. 

How can you not love a henchman called Cuddlyplump?

This is the second book in the series and shows the teddybear army mobilizing against the world. Only Lisa Marie and Vernon know what is going on, and who would believe them if they said anything? Aimed at the youngest middle-grade readers, this would make a brilliant short read for older children, and would also be hugely friendly to readers whose reading age is younger than their actual age. Sweet teddy bears these are not. This is as brilliant a fantasy series as anything in the older middle grade section. 

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The Unlucky Eleven by Phil Earle. Illustrated by Steve May. 

Everything is going wrong for Stanley and his football team The Saints this season. From injuries to misses to unfair judgments by the referee. They think they know why: the Saints have been cursed like football teams of the past. Stanley needs a plan. He presents his team with a magical, lucky kit, but will it change their fortunes?

Sometimes it only takes a shift in attitude to change our fortunes. Stanley tries everything to help his team, but finally, he realises that the team players need to change their own luck. If only he can nudge them along the way. 

A fun story which will go down well with anybody who loves football, and anybody who has ever felt that nothing is going their way. 

The Little Gems series are so attractive that, although they are friendly to children whose reading age is younger than their actual age, they will be picked up and treasured by anybody who loves a good story. They are a great size for any reader who is coming into chapter book format but isn’t yet ready for the language or page length. 

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The Big Top Mysteries: The Case Of The Missing Granny by Alexander McCall Smith. Illustrated by Sam Usher. 

The shortbread siblings star in their family’s circus show. They also have another talent. They are brilliant at solving mysteries. When audience member Tom reveals that his granny has gone missing, the Shortbread siblings step in to help. 

Does this have anything to do with Mrs Fudge and her chocolate shop? Using all their circus skills, the Shortbreads and Tom get straight into the investigation. 

The first in a new series by master mystery writer. 

Aimed at readers from 8 upwards, this would also be a lovely story for readers of early chapter books. Although the children in the story are briefly locked up, the peril is minimal and the outcome of the investigation is friendly to the youngest of readers. With murder mysteries now popular among 8 – 12 year-olds, this would be a great way for readers to join in even if they aren’t up for the blood and fear and gruesome details. 

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Narwhal Unicorn Of The Sea and Super Narwhal and Jellyjolt by Ben Clanton

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Two books. Two friends. A whole new series of awesome undersea adventures. 

Narwhal is a super-happy unicorn of the sea. Jelly is less chirpy, less cheery and full of questions. Together they make a brilliant new duo for readers who are looking for an alternative to a short chapter book. 

Each book has three stories, one fact file and a Super Waffle story which will have young readers in stitches. It’s like the same kind of story … but with a strawberry and a waffle. Any lovers of online comics, GIFS or cartoons will enjoy these. Think cartoon books for the very young. 

In Narwhal Unicorn Of The Sea, the friends meet for the first time, make friends, and form a pod (aka form a wider friendship group). Super Narwhal And Jellyjolt sees them explore their strengths and venture up to the ocean’s surface to meet a starfish. The books are numbered on the spine and I bet they will look fantastic all lined up as a little comic library. 

With simple backgrounds and expressive characters, these stories will encourage readers to draw and create cartoons of their own. 

An attractive new series for early readers. 

 

Thanks to Nosy Crow Books, Barrington Stoke Ltd, Little Tiger UK and Egmont Publishing for the gifted books included in this feature. Opinions my own. 

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