Middle Grade Reviews

Review – The Boy Who Went Magic by A.P. Winter

wentmagic

Extracts:

A hand shook Bert’s shoulder. He gasped and looked around, to find that he was back in the real world again , lying in front of the mirror with the Professor beside him. He wasn’t sure how long he had been oblivious, but he could tell something bad had happened. The other children were shouting in alarm, and Mr Fitzroy was trying to gather them together. 

‘Are you alright?’ said the Professor. 

‘I saw something,’ said Bert. He blinked dizzily. ‘I was in another place.’ 

‘Right, well … that’s interesting,’ said the Professor. He seemed distracted. ‘I’m afraid this really isn’t going to plan. I didn’t imagine they’d have such unstable artifacts.’ 

(The Boy Who Went Magic, AP Winter. P27.) 

 

Synopsis:

Bert’s school insists there is no such thing as magic. The government and Royals of Penvellyn say the same thing. They sanction a museum exhibition to teach the public about all the crazy things people used to believe about magic, and the land of Ferenor. Bert’s class aren’t quite sure what to make of the exhibition. It doesn’t help that a pirate leads their group to a room full of secret objects. Objects Bert has a special connection with.

Bert activates a magic mirror, and attracts the attention of Prince Voss. Voss has his own interest in magic, and in the spirit Bert unwittingly called from the mirror. The Government have been in charge of the country for too long. Once upon a time, Royalty meant something. Voss is keen to bring the old days back. He’ll execute anybody who disagrees.

Bert is swept away from school by the pirate, who goes by the name of the Professor, and his plucky daughter Finch. Their destination is Ferenor – but there are people who would rather they didn’t get there…

 

Review:

I wanted to know more about Bert from the outset. He is rescued from a family who are branded as traitors to the throne. The man who rescues him doesn’t leave an identity, but pays for his education in full, and keeps quiet tabs on Bert. Likewise, Bert’s friend Norton is entirely miserable in Penvellyn. He’d much rather tag along with Bert.

Norton’s relationship with Bert was a highlight of the story. At the start, Bert leaves Norton in school. Bert is desperate for a ‘proper adventure’, and will leave his friend behind if need-be. Bert’s biggest development as a character is in the respect he finds for his friend, and I liked him better for it.

There were so many great locations, at times I wished we had a book for each one. The school, the airship and the strange land of Ferenor – it was like the ultimate Lego game, spread out over an afternoon, in which the adventurer’s legs are pulled off and swapped with the mech’s, while the other adventurer gets the pirate hat. That kind of adventure. A.P. Winter deserves credit. It is difficult to make a world like that believable, but he does so with aplomb. I think this is due to the everyday touches – the school, the museum and the bank, and how totally recognisable they were even with the strange objects inside.

The middle of the story was strong. Wherever there was a goal within the story, there were obstacles. This was interesting from my perspective as an aspiring writer, to see how Winter kept the action going.

The history between Penvellyn and Ferenor acted as a story-within-a-story. The ending implies a sequel. I hope we will find out more about the relationship between the two worlds, and what happened to the mages of Ferenor. Bert learns something pretty huge about himself in the last pages, which hints at the direction the story might take.

There are things we could have learned about Norton. Things we could have learned about the Professor and his airship, and about the land of Ferenor. That can’t be a complaint. It’s more of an impatience. It seems there is more to come, and the first book has whetted my appetite.

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