Board Book

Review: Gregory Goose In On The Loose board book series by Hilary Robinson and Mandy Stanley.

Review: Gregory Goose In On The Loose board book series by Hilary Robinson and Mandy Stanley.

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Featuring On The Moon and In The Jungle

Gregory Goose gets everywhere. The trouble is, it can be difficult to keep up with him when there is so very much to see. This wonderful board book series challenges readers to find Gregory Goose on journeys through different environments.

With bright and attractive pictures, these books offer an exciting game of hide-and-seek.

This format is ever popular, but what I love about the Gregory Goose series is it doesn’t push the game on the reader. It is just as possible to read through one of the books to enjoy the setting as it is to stop and search for Gregory Goose. Every double page spread introduces something new – so when Gregory Goose goes to the moon, for example, we are first introduced to rockets, then to stars, then to planets and so on. This makes the books excellent vocabulary builders. The close focus on one location makes it easy for the reader to pick up new words.

Gregory Goose himself looks friendly and inquisitive – much like a young child exploring the world for the first time. He is a kindred spirit on the great adventure that is this world. 

There is a rhyme scheme to the text, but it feels entirely natural, much like being spoken to in a slightly sing-song voice. This makes the books perfect for repetition – and they will certainly be on repeat for many readers!

The perfect books for little adventurers on the hunt for new facts about the world. 

 

Thanks to Catch A Star for my copies of the books featured in this review. Opinions my own.

Board Book

Review: Apple by Nikki McClure.

Review: Apple by Nikki McClure.

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An apple is picked from the tree. It is forgotten, thrown on the ground, buried, and in time a shoot grows from the earth. This beautiful board-book uses papercuts and minimal words to explore the life-cycle of the apple. 

The perfect book to read as the Harvest comes around. 

Early autumn is my favourite time of year, with fruit on the trees, sunshine and cool breezes which make it perfect for walking. Our village has a large number of apple trees and previous years have brought apple-pie, apple and blackberry crumble and fresh apples in the fruit bowl. Since living here, I have felt more in touch with where our food comes from, and this book is the perfect introduction to exactly that. 

It’s generous, full-page illustrations open lots of conversation about the harvest, composting and growing. 

The illustration is not only beautiful, it is also attractive to the adult reader. Board books begin as a supervised activity, and it is lovely to see one with art that the adults can engage with. Not that the book is aimed at them, but this might encourage big readers to look closer and point out details to the young listener. It would also be lovely to make apple pictures together with black and red crayons. 

At the back, there is an explanation of life-cycles and seasons which would be lovely for older siblings who share in the reading. 

An attractive and engaging book to introduce the science behind food growth. 

 

Thanks to AbramsAppleseed for my gifted copy of Apple. Opinions my own.

Board Book

Review: Little White Fish series by Guido Van Genechten

Review: Little White Fish series by Guido Van Genechten

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Little White Fish is ready to learn. Whether he’s looking for his Mummy, having a birthday party or playing with his friends, he is always soaking in new information. 

Colours, numbers and prepositions are covered by the first three books in this series. They are woven into the narrative in a way which means the reader can choose just to read the story, although the texts are rich with learning opportunities. 

Little White Fish stands out against a black background. If you think this is an odd choice for an ocean story, just wait until you see how striking the fish and corals look in the dark. It reminds me of a fuzzy felt set I had when I was small, where vibrant colours stood out against a black background. 

The ocean is a big place, but there is always a happy face around the corner to help a tiny fish. These stories are charming in a way which avoids being sentimental. 

Although the age recommendation on the back is two years, these would be lovely to read to a smaller child. The bright colours and happy faces would attract tiny eyes, even if they were too young to pick up the information. 

A lovely series with huge potential. Looking forward to seeing what happens next in the ocean. 

 

Thanks to Catch A Star Books for my gifted copies of the Little White Fish stories. Opinions my own.