illustrated · Non-Fiction

Review: Viking Voyagers by Jack Tite.

Review: Viking Voyagers by Jack Tite.

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The Vikings gained a reputation as fearsome and bloodthirsty warriors, but their contributions in other areas deserve equal attention. This book offers a more rounded picture of the Vikings as a voyager civilization. 

An account of the Viking era – which spanned more than 300 years and various countries – is presented alongside information about the Viking myths and legends. That history is given together with mythology offers the reader a rich picture – after all, the stories we tell most often offer clues to who we are as people. The book is divided into six chapters, covering everything from mythology and seafaring to home life, legends and an overview of the earlier and later parts of the Viking era. I was particularly pleased with how the book situated the Vikings within a context of world geography – by showing a world map marked with Viking travel routes, the book makes clear that other parts of the world were home to different people. 

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Illustration brings to life the Norse myths and the day-to-day life within a Viking settlement. Showing the two side by side makes plain how the stories we tell grow out of our geography and our lived experiences. Seeing the same mountains in pictures of the Gods as in the picture of a small farmstead made this plain in a way that no words can. Not only will readers of this book learn about history, but they can begin to think about the links between mythology and life. 

As well as larger, double-page spread illustrations, smaller groups of pictures are labelled clearly such as the food the Vikings might have eaten or the names of the lesser deities. Seeing pictures with labels enables children to learn and test their memories, and readers will soon return to their favourite spreads to find their favourite images. 

Fold-out spreads offer even more to look at. I was particularly impressed with the spread on the Bayeux Tapestry – it looks more modern than replicas of the real thing but maintains a faithful style, engaging younger readers and allowing them to browse and ask questions about what is going on at their leisure. 

This is the kind of book that encourages children to engage their own creativity. The drawing style invites readers to copy or to put the characters and images into scenes of their own. I can see this being hugely popular in classrooms where the topic is being studied for its engaging and intelligent content. It maintains a serious tone whilst offering readers plenty to look at if they aren’t up for a long read. Some spreads have very short sections that are a few sentences long, yet they are all informative and interesting. 

A winner both with adults and young readers. Viking Voyagers offers a rounded perspective and beautiful content to bring to life a favourite topic. 

Middle Grade Reviews · teen

Review: Monster Slayer by Brian Patten and Chris Riddell.

Review: Monster Slayer by Brian Patten and Chris Riddell.

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Synopsis: 

In ancient times, long ago, a King built a Great Hall. He intended it to be a special place for all his people, a place of peace and celebration, but the sound of music awoke a monster. Grendel feasted upon the sleeping warriors and left the community in devastation.

Warriors came from distant lands, but none could defeat Grendel. Then Beowulf came, and with his tricks and cunning, he defeated Grendel. But little did Beowulf know that an even greater monster lay in wait …

A strong retelling of a classic tale.

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Review:

Have you ever played the ultimate bookish game of thinking up dream author/illustrator partnerships for classic or modern classic tales? Just me? Monster Slayer is a fine example of a retelling done right. Brian Patten is a champion wordsmith whose prose chimes in all the right places. Chris Riddell is famed for his slightly gothic line drawings. Together they make the perfect team to tell one of the oldest tales around.

I was nine or ten, and a true bookworm, when Beowulf was put under by nose. I was supposed to like it. I turned it down. Thinking back, I couldn’t picture the historical setting and the author tried too hard to be clever with language in homage to the original text. A clear, well-told story is the very best thing. Monster Slayer reads as if it is being read aloud. The twists and turns come in all the right places and the set-up allows the reader to truly care about the community that is being ravaged by Grendel’s visits.

Together with the illustrations – think full-page line drawings of drooling monsters – and this makes a book that is impossible not to pick up. 

 This edition follows Beowulf up until his battle with Grendel’s Mother and ends on a heroic note. 

Barrington Stoke is committed to breaking down barriers to reading. Shortened versions of classic tales allow readers to get the story into their heads and enjoy the drama of the tale. This is a fabulous introduction to a timeless story. The engaging text, together with the illustrations, make an experience for everybody to enjoy. 

 

Thanks to Barrington Stoke for my copy of Monster Slayer. Opinions my own.

Picture Book Reviews · Picture Books

Review: Shadow by Lucy Christopher and Anastasia Suvorova.

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In the old house, there was nothing to be afraid of. No monsters under the bed. Nothing hiding in the dark. In the new house, Shadow appeared.

With vibes of The Bridge To Terabithia, The Snow Lion, and Skellig, this book was going to win my heart. Superficially dark and scary, it actually sees a little girl work her way through a period of unhappiness in her family. It is not explicitly stated what that is. Others have read this book as a narrative of depression, and how a parent’s illness can affect a child, but I thought the illustrations hinted at grief. Of course, we all bring ourselves to a story, and I am currently grieving the loss of my Mum, but there are pictures on the wall of the house which hint at it being the old family home, and Ma in the story is seen with her head bent over two pictures later on.

Anyway. While this is going on, a little girl is waiting. The house is dark, the world feels dark, and she’s all alone. Except for Shadow.

Is he imaginary? Is he a projection of her feelings? He leads the little girl deeper and deeper away from her ordinary life until she can’t cope anymore. She cries like never before, and suddenly she is able to tell Ma what she is feeling. From then on, the light comes back, and eventually the house is filled with a new life and a new happiness.

Sometimes before the light comes back in, we have to acknowledge the dark.

The illustrations in this story have a beautiful, ethereal quality. The gentle snowy landscapes contrast with the darkness and ensure it isn’t too frightening for the young audience. Somehow it conveys without words that this is about emotions and not about a terrible danger from the outside. At times – like times of grief or depression – it can be difficult to put emotions into words. Shadow puts them into images and promises a lighter, brighter future.

Lucy Christopher is a talented story writer, and her words together with these beautiful illustrations have created something special. The perfect reminder that when darkness strikes, the light can be found by hugging our loved ones.

 

Thanks to Lantana Publishing for my gifted copy of Shadow. Opinions my own.

fairytales · Picture Book Reviews · Picture Books

Review: Magical Myths And Legends. Chosen by Michael Morpurgo.

Review: Magical Myths And Legends. Chosen by Michael Morpurgo.

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Every tale in this book is centuries old. So explains the introduction by Michael Morpurgo which explains that even before we had books, we had stories. 

Regular readers of my blog know that I have a passion for folk tales and legends. They are the stuff on which our dreams are built. They are the place from which other forms of storytelling evolved. It is lovely to see this collection of ten tales about well-known figures like Icarus and Robin Hood. 

This is the perfect introductory book to myths and legends. It looks a challenging size, but the text is large and the illustrations take up most of the page, so it is actually limited to one or two paragraphs per page. This makes it brilliant for less-confident readers, or for sharing aloud in shorter time-spaces, such as bedtime or the gap between lessons and play. 

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It also has a good range of origins – Greek Myths, and English folk tales, and Viking legends among them – and the stories are told and illustrated by different creators. I was particularly charmed, as a Millenial, that many of these the storytellers of my childhood. It felt like something I might have picked up in my childhood library (albeit in the fresher, prettier publishing style of today). Perhaps myths and folk-tales feel like this anyway, but reading words by Tony Bradman and Jeanne Willis added to this effect. These are some of the most established and practiced children’s authors working today. 

The range of illustration styles makes each story feel distinctive. Readers will soon have their favourites, and it is impossible to pick this up without flicking through to pick. 

I am impressed with this as an early collection of folk tales, and as stories that can be shared between people of all ages. This is the perfect book for reading out loud. 

 

Thanks to Oxford University Press for my gifted copy of Magical Myths And Legends. Opinions my own.

 

Non-Fiction

Review: Find Tom In Time – Ancient Egypt by Fatti Burke.

Review: Find Tom In Time – Ancient Egypt by Fatti Burke.

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Whoosh! A magic amulet has transported Tom back to Ancient Egypt alongside his Granny Bea and Digby the cat. There’s so much to see and explore. 

Where’s Wally spotting challenges meet non-fiction in this addictive book which will keep everyone staring at the pages. 

This isn’t a big fat history book. It introduces the reader to the idea of a different historical period through different spreads which show how life, death, religion, housing and daily life might have looked during that time. This gives an overview and flavour of what we know about the general period. Placing one period in relation to another can be difficult, and the first step is to understand that life has happened in times and places other than our own. 

Tom sees so many places along the way that the series would be brilliant for anyone with burning questions. What did school look like? What did people eat and what kind of clothes did they wear? Alongside the spotting game, there are short bites of text to explain what is happening in the pictures. 

The book is addictive, with additional things to spot on every page. It would be great to play alone or in a group, with each person looking for a different thing. 

Granny Bea is a wonderful addition as a female archeologist. Certain jobs are surrounded by stereotypes and the only way to end this is to constantly show all kinds of people filling these roles. 

A fun way to dive into a new period, and a great concept to hook budding historians. 

 

Thanks to Nosy Crow for my gifted copy of Find Tom In Time – Ancient Egypt. Opinions my own.

Young Middle Grade

Younger fiction round-up: June 2019

Younger fiction round-up: June 2019

 

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Cinders And Sparks – Magic At Midnight by Lindsey Kelk. Illustrated by Pippa Curnick.

Cinders lives a boring life with her stepmother and stepsisters. Nothing ever happens to Cinders. She’s too busy doing the jobs. That’s why it is a surprise when her wishes start coming true. Somehow, she makes impossible things happen, like turning her companion dog Sparks into a talking dog.

Her fairy godmother Brian appears to guide her, but he’s not always reliable.

When Cinders wishes to go to the ball, her magic works out and she’s off to the palace in style. However, the story is far from over as she figures out what kind of life she wants to live.

A quirky and magical take on the traditional fairy tale.

Cinders has a sweet tooth, a strange ability to make things happen and a passionate love of the outdoors, but she doesn’t know everything about herself. In this first story, Cinders figures out who she is and is given a choice about what sort of life she wants to lead. Is she destined to be the perfect princess in the tower?

Humour, friendship and a touch of magic make this story sparkle. Cinderella retellings are old as the hills but there is a sense with this one that it is only the beginning. Cinders could be the girl to marry the prince, but she’s discovering a whole other side to her personality.

Illustrations by Pippa Curnik bring out the humour, especially through the facial expressions. Even the animals manage to express their displeasure, alarm and sheer delight in a way which brings the story alive.

This would be brilliant for fans of Sibéal Pounder. It has the same quirky humour and sense of adventure as the Witch Wars series, and I can see Cinders And Sparks growing into a hit.

An Otter Called Pebble

An Otter Called Pebble by Helen Peters. Illustrated by Ellie Snowdown.

Friends Jasmine and Tom are amazed to find a baby otter in the riverbank. Otter cubs haven’t been seen regularly in Sussex for decades. When the little cub is swept downriver, they jump in to help and take her home for some care.

Jasmine calls the little otter Pebble and wants to keep her, but Pebble needs the care of experts and to be with others of her kind. A further blow comes when Jasmine learns how difficult it will be to reunite Pebble with her family. Otters have a wide range and are hard to find. The race is on to find Pebble’s home and family before it is too late to reunite her with her mother.

A beautiful animal rescue story from Helen Peters, whose stories about the countryside are the next best thing to an afternoon ramble. Peters writes about animals with the care and attention of someone who truly cares about their conservation. They are never once treated as toys for the characters to play with. When Jasmine complains about giving Pebble up, she is gently reminded what a privilege it is to spend even a night in the company of a young otter.

This story has just the right level of information to keep readers young and old interested, and everyone wants to see Pebble safely back in the river.

Ellie Snowdon’s illustrations reminded me so much of a walk I enjoyed during the year I lived in Sussex, along the river Ouse. Whether or not Snowdon based her pictures on East Sussex, they fit so very well with the story.

As I child, I devoured Dick King-Smith’s stories, and Helen Peters writes countryside adventures which are fit for a new generation.

 

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Clifftoppers: The Arrowhead Moor Adventure by Fleur Hitchcock.

Ava, Josh, Aiden, and Chloe are a group of cousins who are ready for an outdoor adventure. Together with dog Bella they are ready to explore the countryside around their grandparents’ home.

During a picnic, they overhear a suspicious conversation which leads them to uncover a jewel heist. Twelve shining stones have been hidden inside a hollowed-out book, and a group of adults seems to be organising the book’s collection. Where do the diamonds come from and how can the cousins prevent them from disappearing for good?

Move over Famous Five. A whole new set of cousins are on the case.

A fantastic outdoor mystery adventure which will make most adults nostalgic – even if they didn’t take down a criminal gang during their childhood summers. So many people grew up reading Enid Blyton’s mysteries, and it is only fitting that new stories are written for the current generation. I love how the stories have so much of their own, yet they contain all the things we would hope to see – picnics, animal friends and some serious pedal power.

Fleur Hitchcock is an established mystery writer and I can’t think of anybody better to write a new mystery adventure series. The length is shorter than her previous books, and nothing too grizzly or upsetting happens. This is a feel-good mystery which shows how much fun can be had outdoors.

 

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Beatrix The Bold And The Curse Of The Wobblers by Simon Mockler

Living in a palace should mean you have everything, but Beatrix has never been outside at all. Her aunt and uncle have always told her that there are countless dangers in the outside world. Beatrix isn’t convinced. In fact, she’s starting to think people are keeping secrets.

One day she overhears her uncle talking. Not only does Beatrix learn that she is Queen, she finds out that a terrible army from beyond the woods is willing to kill her. Not only that, but the oath her aunt and uncle swore to protect her turns out not to be so unbreakable after all.

It is up to Beatrix to protect herself, and the first step is to get out into the world outside the palace without being afraid of the Wobblers.

At last, a royal role-model who looks out for herself. No sitting around waiting for a handsome prince for Beatrix. She is far too resilient and bright enough to question what is going on around her. (That’s the trouble with princess in the tower stories. Didn’t they see it coming?) Her inquisitiveness and bravery are on a par with Prince Caspian’s.

That’s not to say there aren’t times she feels afraid. Because bravery doesn’t mean not feeling afraid.

The humour in this story will appeal to readers who like one-liners and snap jokes (Sore Bottom Alley features on the second page,) and there are references to modern day culture to keep even reluctant readers turning the page.

A Shrek-style world with a Queen for our times.

 

Special Delivery

Special Delivery by Jonathan Meres. Illustrated by Hannah Coulson.

Frank wants to save up for a bicycle, so he starts helping with his big sister’s paper round. Along the way, he meets an elderly lady called Mary with a great cowboy collection. When Frank is playing in the park, he goes over to say hello to Mary but realises she is confused. Will she get home safely? Frank decides it is his job to make a very special delivery. 

A gentle story about dementia, responsibility and caring for people in our community. 

This is a wonderful story about the everyday world of a child. It isn’t a big adventure, but it is told in such a way that it stays with the reader and makes them question what they would do in the same situation. 

Mary’s character is shown with empathy. We get to know her as a person before she is in a situation which requires intervention from others, and Frank and his sister behave towards her as they would towards any adult. It is only when she needs help that Frank jumps in. 

A beautifully told story which encourages readers to think about who they might encounter when out and about. 

 

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The Loneliest Kitten by Holly Webb. Illustrated by Sophy Williams.

Darcey’s Dad isn’t big on animals, but the new kitten Charlie is so cute that Darcey is certain he will win Dad over. Darcey spends as much of the summer holidays as possible playing with Charlie, but then school comes around and Charlie is left indoors. Why won’t Darcey play with him anymore? Charlie heads out in search of new adventures and finds an elderly neighbour to talk to.

Darcey can’t understand why Charlie keeps disappearing. Eventually, she begins a search which leads to her neighbour’s door.

A sweet story about companionship, animal welfare, and community.

Sometimes what is best for our animal friends isn’t the first thing we had in mind. Elderly neighbour Rose has time on her hands which Darcey and her family lack, and Charlie the kitten is only too happy to keep Rose company. Is this something which should continue? Darcey has to search deep in her heart to find the answer.

Holly Webb is a prolific writer of fiction for younger readers and this story lives up to her previous titles about animal friends.

 

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My Babysitter Is A Robot by Dave Cousins. Illustrated by Catalina Echeverri.

Having a babysitter for a robot is rubbish. He always knows when there is homework, finds hiding places straight away and embarrasses Jess and Jake in front of their friends. Jake can’t imagine anything worse until an accident in the swimming pool changes everything. Suddenly robot babysitter Robin is badly behaved and it is up to Jess and Jake to stop him from causing absolute mayhem.

A hilarious ride of a story where the tables are turned in a big way.

This reminded me of a children’s television drama where the parents were hypnotized to behave like big children. Big children who refused to follow any of the rules. Although the real kids had to stop trouble from breaking loose, they also saw things from a new perspective. Robin the Robot is the same kind of character. He’ll end up winning you over even as he causes more trouble.

The illustrations bring extra humour as almost human-looking Robin is caught out by little details which make him different.

A brilliant, funny read and an excellent addition to a younger fiction bookshelf.

 

Jolly Rogers

The Jolley-Rogers And The Pirate Piper by Jonny Duddle.

Rats. Rats have infested Dull-On-Sea and closed everything down. Luckily the Pirate Piper is here and he knows just the trick to charm the rats away. The strangest thing is Matilda sees him tucking the crates of rats away on board his ship instead of casting them out to sea. When the Mayor refuses to pay the Piper, children start walking in their sleep. Disappearing.

Can Matilda, Jim and little Nugget save the day? And what does Nugget’s horrible violin have to do with anything?

A wonderful twist on The Pied Piper Of Hamelin set in the familiar world of Dull-On-Sea.

Anyone who knows Jonny Duddle’s pirate stories will know Matilda, the girl who lives on land but has the heart of a pirate, and the crew of the Blackhole. They will also know that the stories are told with just the right level of humour.

The illustrations are more like theatrical scenes which come straight to life in the reader’s imagination. Perhaps it is the action or maybe that they often hint at what is coming next, but I often finish Duddle’s books feeling more like I’ve viewed a performance.

Jump on board and join the Jolley-Rogers in their latest adventure.

 

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Magical Kingdom Of The Birds – The Silent Songbirds by Anne Booth. Illustrated by Rosie Butcher.

Maya is back with the colouring book which transports her into the Magical Kingdom Of The Birds. This time she is attending a singing concert hosted by Princess Willow’s evil uncle, Lord Astor. Willow is adamant that Lord Astor has mended his ways, but her friend Patch senses trouble. Then Lord Astor plays his flute, and it drowns out the sound of the birdsong.

Can Maya help before Lord Astor steals the voices of the birds, and of his niece Willow?

This series is a real favourite of mine in the younger fiction category, and The Silent Songbirds is another hit. It has just the right level of fantasy and conflict, but the beautiful world of the birds and the determined heroes keep the stories from being too dark for their intended audience. These are brilliant stories to share with younger readers, and they are great for older readers looking for something shorter.

The illustrations add to the magic and make the reader feel as if they too have slipped inside Maya’s magical colouring-book. I am considering a campaign for a colouring-book tie-in and would happily sneak one away for my own entertainment.

Another hit in a beautiful series about a magical kingdom which suffers from the actions of an evil Lord.

 

Thanks to Barrington Stoke, Harper Collins, Nosy Crow, Oxford University Press, Picadilly Press, Stripes Books and Templar Publishing for gifting the books in this feature.

Opinions my own.

Middle Grade Reviews

Review: She Wolf by Dan Smith

Review: She Wolf by Dan Smith

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Extract:

‘What happened here wasn’t any kind of destiny; it was murder, and no one expects you to avenge it. Not even your Gods.’

(She Wolf by Dan Smith. P46.)

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 Synopsis:

Viking girl Ylva washes up on the frozen shores of Northumbria, but her mother is killed. Ylva swears to avenge her memory as the Gods decree and sets out into the wild with her wolf Geri.

The land is wild, but it is not only the wolves that Ylva has to fear. She must also work out whether she can trust Cathryn and Bron, the Saxons who offer her shelter.

An epic tale of trust and the truest forms of bravery. 

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Review:

An epic historical adventure which reminded me of the works of Rosemary Sutcliff. Viking attitudes towards revenge were examined in a way which was both sensitive to the time period and relevant to the modern day.

Ylva’s quest for vengeance begins with her certainty, as a Viking, that it is her role. This is the only narrative she has ever heard and it is how her people live. In fact, as she discovers, it is how other tribal people live during the same time period. Cathryn begs Ylva not to go in search of vengeance, but she is set on it. The examination of the motives behind revenge and the use of religious belief to justify it was fascinating. It is also a lesson which might be relevant to much smaller scale problems. Sometimes, no matter what wrong someone has done us, the best thing is to let that be the last bit of damage.

It was great to see a narrative about fights and the quest for justice centered around girls. Although there are male characters, there are female warriors in the story with the same bloodthirst and ideas about vengeance. Girls need to believe they have a decision about when to pick a fight and to know that often the bravest thing you can do is turn away. 

It was also great to see a novel about Vikings in Britain, and especially to see one with both Viking and Saxon characters. Too often these stories are told through a lens which favours one or the other so that even if there are characters of other nationalities, they are cast as antagonists and enemies. Life was more complex than that and it is important to understand that things are never so black and white.

This novel was all about setting, from the mounds of snow to the wolves howling through the pine trees. It is the kind of setting which you feel beneath your skin and imagine with every sense.

If you like adventure or want to know more about the time period, add this to your TBR pile.

 

She Wolf is available now from Chicken House Books, priced £6.99.

Many thanks to Chicken House Books and Laura Smythe PR for my gifted copy. Opinions my own.

Non-Fiction · Picture Book Reviews · Picture Books

Review: Meet The Pirates by James Davies.

Review: Meet The Pirates by James Davies.

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Yarr! Prepare for a voyage of discovery on the seven seas. Everybody has an image of pirates from films and stories, but who were the real-life pirates across history? What does piracy involve? Meet The Pirates is an accessible and humorous introduction to a favourite topic. 

From the Vikings to the modern day pirates with GPS systems, the book is like  a time-line of piracy. 

img_8171This book continues an already popular series which looks at the periods of history covered by the KS2 curriculum. It is easy to see why the series has taken off. The books are highly visual and the information is broken up by the illustrations. Each page contains a short amount of text. It is easy to make the mistake of looking for non-fiction books which match a child’s fictional reading skills, but readers have limited patience when they are learning new facts. The information needs to be broken up, and what is there needs to be written in such a way that it is engaging and memorable, without skimping on the content. 

The limited colour-palette of the illustrations makes the book look trendy and modern. They still manage to incorporate a lot of information, from the kind of pistol Blackbeard carried to the sails on different ships. The illustrations are as informative as the text. 

I love the features of the book. The title of each topic is written down both sides of every spread, so readers can flick through and find the relevant information with ease. As well as informative illustrations, such as a map of trading routes and an image gallery of different types of ship, there are cartoons and humorous illustrations. The importance of comedy in children’s books can’t be stressed enough. For many readers, these cartoons are the reward for taking in new information.

This will doubtless be a hit with teachers and librarians, but it would also make a lovely introduction to the topic for children who have shown an interest in pirates fictional or otherwise. I am hugely impressed with these books and look forward to sharing my review of Meet The Ancient Greeks. 

 

Thanks to Big Picture Press for my copy of Meet The Pirates. 

 

 

Middle Grade Reviews

Review: How To Train Your Dragon (10 book set) by Cressida Cowell

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Review: How To Train Your Dragon (10 book set) by Cressida Cowell

There is only one difficulty about being a children’s literature fanatic, an aspiring author and a book blogger. You can’t read all the books. Until this month I had missed out on one of the biggest children’s series of the 21st Century –  the How To Train Your Dragon stories by Cressida Cowell. 

With millions of copies sold and borrowed worldwide, with a successful film franchise based on the books, it was clear I was missing something. 

When Books2Door offered me the chance to review a boxset, I jumped at the chance. 

So what is How To Train Your Dragon about? 

The story begins with Hiccup, son of the fearless Viking leader Stoik. Hiccup is training to be a great warrior. The only trouble is he is a wimp. My heart went straight out to Hiccup. I was that kid who was picked last for PE. I still have no coordination, no sense of direction and generally no skills which would make me of any use on a sports team.  I rooted for Hiccup from the first chapter and didn’t stop until I had finished the series. 

You see, Hiccup learns that there is more to being a hero than wielding a sword. There are other skills which are valuable in this world, like logic and empathy and resilience. Hiccup has those in spades. He continually outwits perils – from dragons to Barbarians to a deadly volcano – with his own skills and the help of his friends. 

In short, it is about dragons and Vikings and sea battles and warriors. 

The recurring antagonist Alvin keeps the tension up in a way which reminded me of the Harry Potter series. Every time something goes wrong in Hiccup’s life, the reader wants to know whether Alvin is behind it. 

What I loved about the series was the plots differed from each other. The first book is about the other Vikings realising that their tribe needs more than one skill to survive. The second is a quest for an ancient sword. There are quests and mysteries and survival narratives. 

The books are also witty and conscious of their young readership. Passages of text are broken up with slogans in large fonts and information files about dragons which reminded me of Top Trumps cards. 

Would you recommend the books?

The books are page turners and I can see why they are so hugely popular. As well as being a detailed world, they are just well-plotted stories. Reading the boxset was a lovely experience because I was able to follow Hiccup and his friends through their different adventures. The boxset I read contains the first ten books and is available from Books2Door

If you are yet to visit these classics, dive in. You’re in for a treat. 

 

Click here to buy the same set and join the tribe.

Thanks to Books2Door for gifting my set of How To Train Your Dragons books. Opinions my own.