Board Book

Review: Hello House and Hello Garage by Nicola Slater

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Review: Hello House and Hello Garage by Nicola Slater

Ludo is looking for some friends to play with. 

As he travels around the neighborhood, Ludo looks into similar places. In one book he looks into houses. In another he looks into garages. This offers the reader some lift-the-flap fun as they peek inside different buildings and vehicles. Who is inside? What are they up to? 

A bright and cheerful series which introduces young readers to the different things they might find in the local area. 

Tiny people are insatiably curious. What might be a five-minute walk for an adult can drag out into fifty – and that’s not just about the footsteps. Time must be factored in to read street signs and admire insects and wave to passersby. Do you remember being small? Every walk was a learning journey and things which adults took for granted were endlessly fascinating. 

These beautiful books allow readers to explore and to talk about the amazing things they see around them. Background details such as bridges and ponds, cars with open bonnets and cars being hosed down will all provide talking points. These differences are all talking points to people who are seeing them for the first time. What on earth is happening to that car? Why does that bridge look different from the one I’ve seen? The books are not overloaded with details but everyone is thought through as if the designers have seen the world through a toddler’s eye. 

The cast of animal friends will be popular with fans of Peppa Pig and Hello Duggee. Donkeys work alongside rabbits. One of the houses is home to a range of woodland creatures. It is a thriving and pretty world and the characters all look friendly. 

The colour palette is a refreshing mix of natural colours, bright colours, and pastels. While the backgrounds are in a sugary blue, there are plenty of natural details which prevent this from becoming overly sweet. This will make the series more popular with adult readers. 

A gentle series which has resisted becoming sickly sweet. These books offer an introduction to different buildings and places via a lift-the-flap adventure. 

 

Thanks to Nosy Crow for my gifted books. Opinions my own.

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Blogmas 2018 · Board Book · christmas

Review: Where’s Santa Claus by Ingela P Arrhenius

Review: Where’s Santa Claus by Ingela P Arrhenius

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Where’s Mrs Polar Bear? Where’s Santa Claus? Lift the felt-flaps and find all of our festive friends. A hide-and-seek book perfect for sharing with the very tiniest of readers.

Christmas with a tiny baby must be hectic and wonderful. Everyone is enthusiastic to introduce the concept of Christmas, even when the child is too young to fully understand. This book would be a lovely starting-point – introduce the familiar festive characters while the tiny-tot enjoys the tactile flaps and engaging pictures. 

The felt flaps are a brilliant idea. They are attractive for tiny hints to stroke and grab at and are easier to lift than traditional cardboard flaps. Poking or pushing the flaps from almost any angle leads to movement. This would be a brilliant way of teaching babies and tiny-tots how to engage with lift-the-flap books.

The illustrations are bright and bold with lots of colour-blocking and geometric design. They will hold the attention of babies too young to take interest in detailed pictures. At the same time, they are attractive to have on the bookshelves. There is a series of similar books and they would look very cute together.

With its baby-proof flaps and shiny mirror, this is a great option for the youngest people on your shopping list.

 

Thanks to Nosy Crow books for my copy of Where’s Santa Claus? Opinions my own.

Non-Fiction · Picture Book Reviews · Picture Books

Review: Hello World Animals by Nicola Edwards and L’Atelier Cartographik

Review: Hello World Animals by Nicola Edwards and L’Atelier Cartographik

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A lift-the-flap atlas which explores the wildlife by location, teaching readers simultaneously about wildlife and geography. 

The book is a large-format with thick cardboard pages. There is something exciting about holding a book this size. It demands that you settle down and get lost in its pages. Inside are eight double-page spreads: one for each continent and one introductory section.

img_7385The introduction explains that some animals have spread across the world because of their relationship with humans while others are so adaptable they can survive almost anywhere. This was an interesting start because it didn’t shy away from the fact that human activity has had an impact on wildlife. This section also introduces the seven continents, giving a hint about what is coming in the rest of the book. 

Each spread shows the map of one continent. Different animals are located on these maps, with information hidden under flaps. This interactive element will keep readers engaged and guessing what there might be to learn. Flaps also act as a great memory-game when readers are more familiar with the book. Around the maps are different fact files, with topics as varied as camouflage, the life-cycle of a butterfly and environmental crisis. 

Although the format is friendly for readers as young as four, the facts are in-depth enough that this book will satisfy much older readers and it will certainly keep the adults interested. 

A beautiful gift for any lover of wildlife or budding explorer and a wonderful way of learning more about our planet. 

 

Thanks to Little Tiger Press for my copy of Hello World Animals. Opinions my own.