Middle Grade Reviews

Review: The Maker Of Monsters by Lorraine Gregory

Review: The Maker Of Monsters by Lorraine Gregory

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Review:

The creature clutches at his head with his huge hands and lets out a blood-freezing cry, showing off the many rows of enormous serrated white teeth which fill his massive jaws. 

‘You will follow my orders or suffer the consequences!’ Lord Macawber insists, holding the locket with one hand and extending his other palm out towards his creation. 

(The Maker Of Monsters by Lorraine Gregory. P37.) 

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Synopsis:

Brat has lived in the castle since he was small, caring for all the monsters that his master has created. Some of the monsters are kind, but recently they’ve become scary and dangerous. Lord Macawber’s plan is to build a monster army and rescue his daughter, but one day the monsters get out of control and turn on their creator.

Only Brat can escape into the city and warn the other people of the danger but do this he must overcome the feeling that he is hopeless.

The world outside the castle may be as brutal as the one inside.

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Review:

A fantasy story which explores the definition of the word monster.

Like Dr Frankenstein, Lord Macawber creates monsters from body parts. His reasoning is that his daughter was taken from him and he is entitled to revenge. And certainly the man he is seeking to harm has done some terrible things. The novel explores whether Lord Macawber’s reaction is justified when other people who have been harmed are looking to find their own place in the world without endangering others.

Lord Macawber shows no respect for the creatures he creates. His early creatures, whose personalities were too kind for the job, are treated as scrap. Brat, whose life Macawber sees as worthless compared to that of his daughter, is treated as a slave whose life is disposable. However, it is Brat who acts with humanity, warning the other people of the danger. The theme of prejudice recurs throughout the book. Brat and his monster friends have learned that they are worthless, but eventually they question what they have always been told and find new ways to define themselves.

The setting is spook-tacular. A crumbling castle over the sea. A community of outcasts. A walled city with hidden tunnels. This is a wonderful landscape to adventure through and all the large buildings serve to make Brat appear smaller and even less significant than he feels.

Although this is short it has real depth and an extraordinary narrative which balances various subplots and settings. It would be wonderful for older readers after something shorter.

A wonderful fantasy which pays tribute to Frankenstein but brings something new and entirely magical of its own.

 

Thanks to Oxford University Press for my gifted copy of The Maker Of Monsters. Opinions my own.