Middle Grade Reviews

Review: Under Earth by Ellen Renner

Review: Under Earth by Ellen Renner

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Extract:

‘He’ll try to dazzle you with riches and promises! Keep your wits about you, Niece, and meet me in the Merry Whale in a five-day when the sun is six hands risen above the sea.’ (Under Earth by Ellen Renner. P29.)

 

Synopsis:

Storm’s duties as a Weather witch are getting real. She must give up her identity as a female, sail with the fleet and remain loyal to Yanlin. Her first big test turns out to be the trading island of Bellum. Bellum’s wealth is tightly controlled by a collective called the Pact, who shower Storm with gifts and attention, but it is apparent that the Pact want something of Storm’s powers in return.

The more Storm sees of Bellum Town, the more questions she has. Why are there children in poverty when there is so much wealth on the island? Why are there no local artisans? And what does the Salamander – the great, god-like spirit of fire which wants her dead – have in store for Storm?

As Storm pieces together the evidence, she learns more about her own magic. About the reason she was chosen by the other three Elementals.

 

Review:

Under Earth follows on from Storm Witch, a middle-grade fantasy which won my love in 2018. Storm lives in a world where great god-like beings rule over earth, air, water and fire. Three of these Elementals have chosen storm for a mission. The fourth, the Salamander of Fire, has tried to kill her – and will try again as it tries to upset the balance of the world and gain power. Storm knows she has been chosen as a Weather witch but not why. This story follows her as she comes to terms with what she must accept and sacrifice in order to fulfill her role.

It also introduces a new part of the world. Bellum Island is one of the wealthiest nations, yet the majority of its money is hoarded by an elite group of families. Other citizens are barely recognised as such. They are treated as second-rate people. As scavengers and slackers and a complete drain on the island’s resources. What is more, traditional skills are at an all-time low. The island no longer produces things of its own. All of its wealth is in trade. Bellum may be beautiful on the surface, especially to a guest of the Pact, but at its heart, its values are rotten to the core.

Similarities between Bellum and current-day Britain are striking. This book explores political crisis from the angle of trade and international relations, both concepts which too many adults ignore when talking about Brexit and austerity.  While these are deep subjects, they are woven into the story in such a way to provide rich details without slowing the pace. The main question for the readers is will Storm be tempted away from her home in Yanlin? Or forced?

There’s also her ongoing fight with the Salamander. This is something I loved about the series from the start. Think Moana. Think of a sea-based world where knowledge of the Gods remains to varying extents, but where everyone knows the origin stories. That’s Storm’s world too. Fire has always been held in check by Earth, Air and Water, but now it is making a bid for greater power. The consequences, if it breaks free, could destroy the world.

The ending has left me desperate for the next installment. It also linked back to those themes of austerity in a touching way. There is something about Storm which makes her different from every ‘chosen one’ you can think of. I can’t say more without spoilers, but I found this side of the story touching and brilliant.

Under Earth moves the story along while living up to the magic of Storm Witch. I am already waiting to get my hands on the third volume. Great stuff.

 

Thanks to Nosy Crow LTD for my copy of Under Earth. Opinions my own.

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Middle Grade Reviews

Review: The Switching Hour by Damaris Young

Review: The Switching Hour by Damaris Young

Switching Hour

Extract:

‘Until the rains arrive,’ Granny Uma said, ‘you must come home before the Switching Hour. No one is safe from Badeko the Dream Eater at night, no matter how fast you think you can run.’ 

(The Switching Hour by Damaris Young. P15.)

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Synopsis:

Everyone knows about Badeko. He creeps into house and steals away children to devour their dreams. When he has finished feasting on them, the memory of their existence disappears from their loved ones, who then suffer from terrible grief known as The Sorrow Sickness.

Amaya knows the rules. Every night she locks the door to protect herself and her little brother from the sorrow sickness. Then one day she loses her temper and in the aftermath, she forgets to lock the door.

Her small brother is taken, except Amaya determines to bring him back. With the help of her pet goat Tau and new friend Mally, Amaya sets out to find the Badeko’s nest.

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Review:

When a talented storyteller begins a tale, it creates a feeling in the reader. Something like a shiver, except they are so hooked that they sit still. This is the feeling I had whilst reading The Switching Hour. I knew from the first page that I was in the hands of a talented author.

The story also centres around climate issues, which have never been more relevant given the climate emergency which threatens life on our planet. Amaya lives in an extreme climate, and the terrible creature which steals children from their homes was awoken by drought. The community desperately awaits the rains which will send Badeko back to sleep. This is the first time I have seen a tale about a creature awoken by climate crisis, and yet it felt like something I knew inside my heart. As if the story is already playing out around us and the author told it in the very best way.

On a personal note, Amaya’s grief for her mother was told in a real and beautiful way. As a twenty-something who has just undergone the same loss, I related to much of what Amaya felt. That desperate fear that I will forget details about my mother, and that I am not doing as she would want in any given situation. Bereavement and loss is not only a thing that happened at some point in time. It shapes a person’s reactions and thoughts and emotions ever after. The Switching Hour shows this to perfection.

The story feels like a folk tale not only because of the forest and the fantastical creature but because it tells a story of our times and poses a question: do we want this to happen?

The Switching Hour is not only a strong concept, it is told with language so beautiful it gets under the skin. This is storytelling. This is what a good book looks like.  

A haunting and memorable debut.

 

Thanks to Scholastic Children’s Books for my gifted copy of The Switching Hour. Opinions my own.

Middle Grade Reviews · teen · Young Adult Reviews

Blog tour: Earth Swarm by Tim Hall.

Blog tour: Earth Swarm by Tim Hall.

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Extract:

Each one was about the size of a small car. And they were clearly metallic – all hard edges and dull gleaming surfaces. Yet at the same time – these machines – they were so lifelike. They flew with an undulating motion, like that of a fly. Their wings were a greenish blur at their sides. Each had a pair of reddish orbs, like compound eyes. 

(Earth Swarm by Tim Hall. P82.) 

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Synopsis:

A swarm of killer drones has descended on London.

Hal Strider wishes his Dad had a little bit more family time. Like any time. But there’s been a lot going on at Starr-Strider Biomimetics, especially since Tony Daeger turned up. That’s when the secret plans began. When the drones attack London, leading to mass evacuation and widespread panic, Hal realises they were built by his father’s company. And now his Dad is nowhere to be found.

Hal and his sister Jess are determined to prove their father’s innocence and to save the city, but they are up against machines which never stop, police officers who don’t want to listen and seven million people in panic. They also have something which the person responsible really wants. Perhaps Hall can figure out the truth with the help of the incredible, free-flying girl Sky, but they are up against a deadly enemy and time is running out.

A spectacular new Sci-Fi series suited to fans of Mortal Engines. 

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Review:

Everyone remembers where they were the day the drones struck.

Although the drones themselves are the stuff of Sci-Fi, the story is made relatable by the atmosphere. A historical news story is breaking, like 9/11 or days after Princess Diana died. The drone attack marks a transition in recent human history. The mass exodus, too, feels very much news footage from recent years although the setting is changed. Now it is Londoners whose homes are under siege. Earth Swarm is the sort of story which asks the reader to face big questions. What would it take to provoke such movement of people in the West? Should Capitalism and the quest for money put humanity at risk?

It is also a compelling adventure.

Even at the start, before we see the drones, Hal Strider’s life seems pretty exciting. He’s a trained pilot whose flying skills would be the envy of most adults. The range of aircraft and gadgets made me think of Thunderbirds. This story begins with a wealthy boy and his techy toys. Hal’s character goes far deeper than that, and his desperate longing to spend more time with his Dad will be relatable to young readers whose parents have no choice but to work overtime.

The drones themselves are like something from a horror film. There are masses of them and nobody knows who is at the controls or what their agenda is. Short passages at the end of some chapters offer the reader a drones-eye view of the action and drip feed information about what the drones are capable of. This increased my anticipation as I was reading the main action because my knowledge of what the drones could do felt incomplete, but I was given enough each time to feel that they were hiding some pretty mega technology.

And it turns out the clue is in the name. SWARM. Emphasis on the WAR.

This is a fast-paced adventure with high stakes, and I am delighted to see a children’s book centered around drone technology. Not so long ago, drones brought UK airports to a halt and raised big questions about how such basic air technology was able to invade the airspace. In my opinion, there are so many grey areas about drones which have yet to be explored, and these grey areas are the perfect place to find stories.

While this is aimed at a teen or older middle-grade audience, it has crossover appeal and huge potential to evolve into a series. The story explores the lengths to which people will go for personal gain, and how increasingly-sophisticated technology is putting us at risk from these individuals. It is also a fast-paced and convincing adventure.

The drones have arrived. Could they be our downfall?

 

Thanks to David Fickling Books for my copy of Earth Swarm. Opinions my own.

Middle Grade Reviews

Review: Peril En Pointe by Helen Lipscombe.

Review: Peril En Pointe by Helen Lipscombe.

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Extract:

‘OK, fairies – one more for luck.’ Mr Lamont squints into his phone. ‘Can the Lilac Fairy move to the front? And Golden Vine, you to the back. Milly, did you hear me? That’s it – a bit further back. Smashing. Everyone smile for the camera. Let’s hear you say “Scarlet Slipper”.’
‘Scarlet Slipper!’
‘Smiley face, Milly. And again . . .’

(Peril En Pointe by Helen Lipscombe. P1.) 

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Synopsis:

First Milly messes up the dance of her life. Then her famous ballerina mother vanishes into mid-air.

After the fiasco at the Scarlet Slipper Ballet Prize event, Milly thinks she has hung up her pointe-shoes for good. Then she receives a mysterious letter telling her she has received a place at Swan House ballet school.

Beneath the tutus and tiaras, Swan House is also a school for spies.

Milly learns about her mother’s time at the school and realises exactly how much danger she is in, but how can Milly help when she can’t even get through her lessons without disaster? And why has she been made lead ballerina in the latest round of the Scarlet Slippers?

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Review:

Who says ballerinas are dainty? They are super fit, trained in languages and they travel the world, which makes them brilliantly placed to be spies. And this is the ballet spy story of your dreams. Think past grudges, secret weapons and lots and lots of dance practice.

Mysteries and detective stories are a favourite genre of mine and this story has incredible series potential. Swan House is a brilliant setting which places equal importance on the two main aspects of its curriculum. It is also an old building with a rich history, and it is home to some technical geniuses as well as to the pupils themselves.

Milly’s storyline is all about jealousy and doubt. Her best friend Willow is a bully and a liar, but she has always received heaps of praise and attention from Milly’s mother. Over the years Milly has struggled to outshine Willow and this rivalry destroys Milly’s confidence until she hangs her shoes up for good. With ballet being notoriously competitive, this was a brilliant storyline.

The first case centres on the school itself, although locations outside the school include a prestigious shop in Covent Garden and Milly’s London home. Pupils from rival schools are invited in to compete in the best fictional school tournament since The Goblet Of Fire. There was a hint of Durmstrang in the distinctive and memorable natures of each school and this will appeal to Potter fans for the nostalgia as well as the story.  

I am certainly enchanted by this new world and look forward to seeing where Milly goes next. Her future spy missions could take her almost anywhere, and I hope she keeps the ballet shoes close to her side.  

 

Thanks to Chicken House Books And Laura Smythe PR for my copy of Peril En Pointe. Opinions my own.

Young Middle Grade

Younger fiction round-up: June 2019

Younger fiction round-up: June 2019

 

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Cinders And Sparks – Magic At Midnight by Lindsey Kelk. Illustrated by Pippa Curnick.

Cinders lives a boring life with her stepmother and stepsisters. Nothing ever happens to Cinders. She’s too busy doing the jobs. That’s why it is a surprise when her wishes start coming true. Somehow, she makes impossible things happen, like turning her companion dog Sparks into a talking dog.

Her fairy godmother Brian appears to guide her, but he’s not always reliable.

When Cinders wishes to go to the ball, her magic works out and she’s off to the palace in style. However, the story is far from over as she figures out what kind of life she wants to live.

A quirky and magical take on the traditional fairy tale.

Cinders has a sweet tooth, a strange ability to make things happen and a passionate love of the outdoors, but she doesn’t know everything about herself. In this first story, Cinders figures out who she is and is given a choice about what sort of life she wants to lead. Is she destined to be the perfect princess in the tower?

Humour, friendship and a touch of magic make this story sparkle. Cinderella retellings are old as the hills but there is a sense with this one that it is only the beginning. Cinders could be the girl to marry the prince, but she’s discovering a whole other side to her personality.

Illustrations by Pippa Curnik bring out the humour, especially through the facial expressions. Even the animals manage to express their displeasure, alarm and sheer delight in a way which brings the story alive.

This would be brilliant for fans of Sibéal Pounder. It has the same quirky humour and sense of adventure as the Witch Wars series, and I can see Cinders And Sparks growing into a hit.

An Otter Called Pebble

An Otter Called Pebble by Helen Peters. Illustrated by Ellie Snowdown.

Friends Jasmine and Tom are amazed to find a baby otter in the riverbank. Otter cubs haven’t been seen regularly in Sussex for decades. When the little cub is swept downriver, they jump in to help and take her home for some care.

Jasmine calls the little otter Pebble and wants to keep her, but Pebble needs the care of experts and to be with others of her kind. A further blow comes when Jasmine learns how difficult it will be to reunite Pebble with her family. Otters have a wide range and are hard to find. The race is on to find Pebble’s home and family before it is too late to reunite her with her mother.

A beautiful animal rescue story from Helen Peters, whose stories about the countryside are the next best thing to an afternoon ramble. Peters writes about animals with the care and attention of someone who truly cares about their conservation. They are never once treated as toys for the characters to play with. When Jasmine complains about giving Pebble up, she is gently reminded what a privilege it is to spend even a night in the company of a young otter.

This story has just the right level of information to keep readers young and old interested, and everyone wants to see Pebble safely back in the river.

Ellie Snowdon’s illustrations reminded me so much of a walk I enjoyed during the year I lived in Sussex, along the river Ouse. Whether or not Snowdon based her pictures on East Sussex, they fit so very well with the story.

As I child, I devoured Dick King-Smith’s stories, and Helen Peters writes countryside adventures which are fit for a new generation.

 

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Clifftoppers: The Arrowhead Moor Adventure by Fleur Hitchcock.

Ava, Josh, Aiden, and Chloe are a group of cousins who are ready for an outdoor adventure. Together with dog Bella they are ready to explore the countryside around their grandparents’ home.

During a picnic, they overhear a suspicious conversation which leads them to uncover a jewel heist. Twelve shining stones have been hidden inside a hollowed-out book, and a group of adults seems to be organising the book’s collection. Where do the diamonds come from and how can the cousins prevent them from disappearing for good?

Move over Famous Five. A whole new set of cousins are on the case.

A fantastic outdoor mystery adventure which will make most adults nostalgic – even if they didn’t take down a criminal gang during their childhood summers. So many people grew up reading Enid Blyton’s mysteries, and it is only fitting that new stories are written for the current generation. I love how the stories have so much of their own, yet they contain all the things we would hope to see – picnics, animal friends and some serious pedal power.

Fleur Hitchcock is an established mystery writer and I can’t think of anybody better to write a new mystery adventure series. The length is shorter than her previous books, and nothing too grizzly or upsetting happens. This is a feel-good mystery which shows how much fun can be had outdoors.

 

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Beatrix The Bold And The Curse Of The Wobblers by Simon Mockler

Living in a palace should mean you have everything, but Beatrix has never been outside at all. Her aunt and uncle have always told her that there are countless dangers in the outside world. Beatrix isn’t convinced. In fact, she’s starting to think people are keeping secrets.

One day she overhears her uncle talking. Not only does Beatrix learn that she is Queen, she finds out that a terrible army from beyond the woods is willing to kill her. Not only that, but the oath her aunt and uncle swore to protect her turns out not to be so unbreakable after all.

It is up to Beatrix to protect herself, and the first step is to get out into the world outside the palace without being afraid of the Wobblers.

At last, a royal role-model who looks out for herself. No sitting around waiting for a handsome prince for Beatrix. She is far too resilient and bright enough to question what is going on around her. (That’s the trouble with princess in the tower stories. Didn’t they see it coming?) Her inquisitiveness and bravery are on a par with Prince Caspian’s.

That’s not to say there aren’t times she feels afraid. Because bravery doesn’t mean not feeling afraid.

The humour in this story will appeal to readers who like one-liners and snap jokes (Sore Bottom Alley features on the second page,) and there are references to modern day culture to keep even reluctant readers turning the page.

A Shrek-style world with a Queen for our times.

 

Special Delivery

Special Delivery by Jonathan Meres. Illustrated by Hannah Coulson.

Frank wants to save up for a bicycle, so he starts helping with his big sister’s paper round. Along the way, he meets an elderly lady called Mary with a great cowboy collection. When Frank is playing in the park, he goes over to say hello to Mary but realises she is confused. Will she get home safely? Frank decides it is his job to make a very special delivery. 

A gentle story about dementia, responsibility and caring for people in our community. 

This is a wonderful story about the everyday world of a child. It isn’t a big adventure, but it is told in such a way that it stays with the reader and makes them question what they would do in the same situation. 

Mary’s character is shown with empathy. We get to know her as a person before she is in a situation which requires intervention from others, and Frank and his sister behave towards her as they would towards any adult. It is only when she needs help that Frank jumps in. 

A beautifully told story which encourages readers to think about who they might encounter when out and about. 

 

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The Loneliest Kitten by Holly Webb. Illustrated by Sophy Williams.

Darcey’s Dad isn’t big on animals, but the new kitten Charlie is so cute that Darcey is certain he will win Dad over. Darcey spends as much of the summer holidays as possible playing with Charlie, but then school comes around and Charlie is left indoors. Why won’t Darcey play with him anymore? Charlie heads out in search of new adventures and finds an elderly neighbour to talk to.

Darcey can’t understand why Charlie keeps disappearing. Eventually, she begins a search which leads to her neighbour’s door.

A sweet story about companionship, animal welfare, and community.

Sometimes what is best for our animal friends isn’t the first thing we had in mind. Elderly neighbour Rose has time on her hands which Darcey and her family lack, and Charlie the kitten is only too happy to keep Rose company. Is this something which should continue? Darcey has to search deep in her heart to find the answer.

Holly Webb is a prolific writer of fiction for younger readers and this story lives up to her previous titles about animal friends.

 

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My Babysitter Is A Robot by Dave Cousins. Illustrated by Catalina Echeverri.

Having a babysitter for a robot is rubbish. He always knows when there is homework, finds hiding places straight away and embarrasses Jess and Jake in front of their friends. Jake can’t imagine anything worse until an accident in the swimming pool changes everything. Suddenly robot babysitter Robin is badly behaved and it is up to Jess and Jake to stop him from causing absolute mayhem.

A hilarious ride of a story where the tables are turned in a big way.

This reminded me of a children’s television drama where the parents were hypnotized to behave like big children. Big children who refused to follow any of the rules. Although the real kids had to stop trouble from breaking loose, they also saw things from a new perspective. Robin the Robot is the same kind of character. He’ll end up winning you over even as he causes more trouble.

The illustrations bring extra humour as almost human-looking Robin is caught out by little details which make him different.

A brilliant, funny read and an excellent addition to a younger fiction bookshelf.

 

Jolly Rogers

The Jolley-Rogers And The Pirate Piper by Jonny Duddle.

Rats. Rats have infested Dull-On-Sea and closed everything down. Luckily the Pirate Piper is here and he knows just the trick to charm the rats away. The strangest thing is Matilda sees him tucking the crates of rats away on board his ship instead of casting them out to sea. When the Mayor refuses to pay the Piper, children start walking in their sleep. Disappearing.

Can Matilda, Jim and little Nugget save the day? And what does Nugget’s horrible violin have to do with anything?

A wonderful twist on The Pied Piper Of Hamelin set in the familiar world of Dull-On-Sea.

Anyone who knows Jonny Duddle’s pirate stories will know Matilda, the girl who lives on land but has the heart of a pirate, and the crew of the Blackhole. They will also know that the stories are told with just the right level of humour.

The illustrations are more like theatrical scenes which come straight to life in the reader’s imagination. Perhaps it is the action or maybe that they often hint at what is coming next, but I often finish Duddle’s books feeling more like I’ve viewed a performance.

Jump on board and join the Jolley-Rogers in their latest adventure.

 

magic kingdom of the birds

Magical Kingdom Of The Birds – The Silent Songbirds by Anne Booth. Illustrated by Rosie Butcher.

Maya is back with the colouring book which transports her into the Magical Kingdom Of The Birds. This time she is attending a singing concert hosted by Princess Willow’s evil uncle, Lord Astor. Willow is adamant that Lord Astor has mended his ways, but her friend Patch senses trouble. Then Lord Astor plays his flute, and it drowns out the sound of the birdsong.

Can Maya help before Lord Astor steals the voices of the birds, and of his niece Willow?

This series is a real favourite of mine in the younger fiction category, and The Silent Songbirds is another hit. It has just the right level of fantasy and conflict, but the beautiful world of the birds and the determined heroes keep the stories from being too dark for their intended audience. These are brilliant stories to share with younger readers, and they are great for older readers looking for something shorter.

The illustrations add to the magic and make the reader feel as if they too have slipped inside Maya’s magical colouring-book. I am considering a campaign for a colouring-book tie-in and would happily sneak one away for my own entertainment.

Another hit in a beautiful series about a magical kingdom which suffers from the actions of an evil Lord.

 

Thanks to Barrington Stoke, Harper Collins, Nosy Crow, Oxford University Press, Picadilly Press, Stripes Books and Templar Publishing for gifting the books in this feature.

Opinions my own.

Middle Grade Reviews

Review: Spies In St Petersburg by Katherine Woodfine

Review: Spies In St Petersburg by Katherine Woodfine

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Extract:

The Chief had just told her that Sophie was fine – that there was nothing for her to worry about. But he had lied. He hadn’t heard from Sophie in over a month – she was missing in St Petersburg, all the way on the other side of Europe.

(Spies In St Petersburg by Katherine Woodfine. P33.)

 

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Synopsis:

When Lil is given her second mission from the Secret Service Bureau she finds out something alarming. Sophie’s messages from St Petersburg have stopped arriving. Nobody knows where she is. Lil is supposed to be off to Hamburg, but there’s no way she’s leaving Sophie in danger. Even if it means dragging the impossible Carruthers all the way to Russia.

Behind the spectacular jewelry shops and the excitement of the circus setting up, trouble is building in St Petersburg. Whispers of a revolution may be student gossip, or they may hint at something greater.

Once again it is up to Sophie and Lil to save the day.

 

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Review:

Fans of The Sinclair’s Mysteries will remember Sophie and Lil from their days at Sinclair’s Department Store. The Taylor And Rose series follows their adventures and misadventures as they solve cases for the Secret Service Bureau and continue their quest to stop a certain group from causing trouble. Their role as secret agents takes them all over the world. This time the adventure centres on Pre-Revolutionary Russia.

Katherine Woodfine is the master of series. One end is a new beginning. The ongoing fight with a very secret society allows every book to be both its own self-contained adventure and part of a bigger picture.

She’s also good at cliff hangers and this book will leave you screaming for the next one on at least three counts.

The reader is at an advantage during this plot because, unlike Lil, we know what Sophie is up to. The question is why are her messages not getting through? The old gang comes into the story too, and there is the first hint of romance as Joe and Lil each question to themselves whether there could be anything between them. While this is no more than a hint, it made me wonder what the bigger picture is and whether Lil could have a whole new side to her life in later books.

St Petersburg is a fantastic setting, with the opulence on one hand and the fear and unrest on another, and Woodfine captures a place where everyone is looking over their shoulders. People are disagreeing about the political situation and two people in one family can have very different views. It is a time when the wrong word can be a life sentence. There are also warm homes where family and lodgers and guests live side by side and eat from the same table. It couldn’t be a better setting for this story, and I felt as if Woodfine had taken time to study and represent the historical details.

A fantastic addition to the series which sees the characters moving on internally, questioning what their moral positions would be in certain scenarios and learning ever more about their enemy. Katherine Woodfine is a confirmed genius of the mystery adventure. However long the wait for the next book feels, I know it will be worth it.

 

Thanks to Egmont UK for my gifted copy of Spies In St Petersburg. Opinions my own. 

 

 

 

 

 

Middle Grade Reviews

Review: Rumblestar by Abi Elphinstone

Review: Rumblestar by Abi Elphinstone

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Extract:

The dust around Casper shifted and seemed to glitter in the half-light and it was then – in that hushed moment – that the Extremely Unpredictable Event occurred. 

The key Casper was holding now looked altogether different. Without the layer of dust covering it, he could see that it was not simply a dull lump of metal anymore. It was silver and in its base there was a turquoise gem, which was glowing. 

(Rumblestar by Abi Elphinstone. P23.) 

 

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Synopsis:

Casper Tock is allergic to adventure. He lives by a timetable and believes in solid evidence and facts. It is the shock of his life when, first he stumbles into the magical world of Rumblestar and then he is told it is his job to save the world.

Utterly Thankless has lived in Rumblestar all her life. She’s a bottler-in-training, learning to contain the magic which creates weather. Life hasn’t been the same for Utterly since the terrible thing which she refuses to talk about.

Now the evil harpy Morg is awakening and her magic is once more a threat to the magical Unmapped Kingdoms. Can Casper, Utterly and their dragon friend Arlo work together to save the world from Morg and her Midnights?

A magical quest from the master of fantasy Abi Elphinstone.

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Review:

A harpy trapped in a void, a magical grandfather clock and a series of secret worlds where the weather is produced and sent to Earth. No writer should be able to pull all that off in one story, but Abi Elphinstone does so not only with ease but with apparent relish. She’s the kind of storyteller who seems to have a magical bag full of ideas which she ties together into brilliant narratives.

Rumblestar is the first book in the Unmapped Chronicles series, although the prequel Everdark was published on World Book Day. It helps to have read this, as the events of the story are referenced, although it is not strictly necessary.

Landscape always plays a part in Elphinstone’s world, from the Scottish Highland forests and rivers of the Dreamsnatcher trilogy to the icy lands of standalone novel Sky Song. For the first time, Elphinstone has invented her own lands to great effect. The Unmapped Kingdoms are where weather is invented. Each land is responsible for a different weather family, and Rumblestar is where the weather is processed and transferred to the world we know. Casper Tock’s world.

Rumblestar felt like something from Diana Wynne Jones. It is both a place where people live and work, and it is also the central part of a magical system. Reading this story made me feel as if I’d had my eyes shut to an important truth about our world, or maybe just that I should be searching for magic hidden just out of sight. This is the kind of story which makes readers believe that life is big and incredible, and that imagination is a powerful asset on our journey.

There was also an environmental message – one desperately needed given the current crisis. This was not invasive but it is important for readers to start thinking and caring about our world.

A book which is part fairytale and part breathtaking adventure. Another hit from Abi Elphinstone which will leave her readers dreaming of magical worlds.